Synanthedon pictipes

Synanthedon pictipes

Synanthedon pictipes

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  • Política de devolución (editar con el módulo Información de seguridad y confianza para el cliente) Política de devolución (editar con el módulo Información de seguridad y confianza para el cliente)

Description and life cycle

Adults are flying moths that look like wasps. The veins and the margins of the transparent wings are bordered with blue steel scales; the body is blue and is marked with yellow. Males of lesser perforating peachtree have yellow scales on the top of the head between the eyes and black scales between the antennae. This combination differentiates them from the peachtree borer males, which have black scales between the eyes and yellow scales between the antennae. The larvae of the smaller peachtree borer are white with a yellowish brown head and reach 1 inch at maturity.

Generations

There are two and possibly a third partial generation each year; the first flight occurs during May and June, and the second during August and September. The smaller peachtree borer hibernates as a larva and reaches full growth during April and May. Larvae eat an exit hole almost through the bark, spin a cocoon and pupate in a small cavity. In 3 to 4 weeks, a clear-winged moth emerges, leaving an empty pupal skin that projects from the burrow. Adults are active for several weeks. The female moth is able to deposit several hundred eggs in the crevices, under the scales of the bark and in the kangaroo areas. Moths are attracted to trees that have been damaged or infested previously. The eggs hatch in a week to 10 days, and the young worms move towards the inner bark and continue feeding.

Supervision

Producers note for the first time evidence of auger infestation when verifying the presence of pupal skins in the treated areas. An early sign of a minor injury to the peachtree borer is the presence of wood chips, sawdust and excrement produced by the feeding of borers in the gum in areas with sweepings. If the gum does not contain this particulate material, the injury is probably not caused by perforators. As an aid at the time of spraying, producers should obtain records of pheromone traps in flight activity. Try the maximum flight, usually towards the end of June, if there is an average of more than two borers per tree, and again at the end of the summer. If there are less than two pupa skins on each tree, select only the second generation at the end of the summer.

Cultural Management

Any horticultural practice that prevents the canker and maintains good tree development will help prevent damage to the borer.

Mating interruption

A pheromone has been registered to control the peachtree minor borer in peach, nectarine, cherry, plum, plum and apricot. The dispensers release pheromones for 100 to 120 days and must be placed in the garden before the emergence of the moth in the spring. For effective control of the smaller peachtree borer, use the recommended amount of pheromone dispensers per acre. To improve the efficiency of the mating interruption, distribute the dispensers evenly throughout the block.

SYPI P
Data sheet
Format
Septum
Duration
45 days / 6 weeks
Affects
Fruit trees
Units
1u

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Synanthedon pictipes

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